CHARACTERISATION OF MYOELECTRIC ARTEFACTS IN CLINICAL SOCKETS

Authors

  • Alix Chadwell
  • Matthew Dyson

Abstract

A significant disparity exists between the functionality promised by modern multi-grip myoelectric prostheses and the reality of myoelectric control using clinical-standard sockets and electrodes. Unpredictable prosthesis behaviour means users will often choose not to use their prosthesis for certain tasks. One source of unpredictability in upper-limb prostheses are unintended device activations, that is to say prostheses opening or closing when the user did not intend for the action to occur. Unintended device activations occur when the output of electromyography sensors reach a given threshold. During closed-loop control it is usually not possible to determine whether sensors reach threshold due to mechanical disturbances inducing motion artefacts or because of genuine, but unintended, muscle activity. We present preliminary data from experiments which use arrays of sensors to characterise how and why artefacts may occur in clinical-standard upper-limb prosthesis sockets. Current data show early trends in physical positions which lead to unintended activation and shows some artefacts are concurrent with intended muscle activity.

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Published

2022-08-09

How to Cite

[1]
A. Chadwell and M. Dyson, “CHARACTERISATION OF MYOELECTRIC ARTEFACTS IN CLINICAL SOCKETS”, MEC Symposium, Aug. 2022.

Issue

Section

Myoelectric Control Algorithms