WELL-BEING AMONG INDIVIDUALS WITH UPPER LIMB AMPUTATION IS STRONGLY CORRELATED WITH BIMANUAL UPPER LIMB FUNCTION, ACTIVITY AND PARTICIPATION LEVELS, PROSTHETIC SATISFACTION AND LOWER RATES OF PAIN INTERFERENCE

Authors

  • Phillip Stevens
  • Amy Todd
  • Steve Mandacina
  • Dwiesha England
  • Shane Wurdeman

Abstract

A retrospective analysis of 250 individuals with upper limb amputation or limb deficiency was performed to better understand the relationships being well-being and upper extremity function, activity and participation, prosthesis satisfaction and wear times and pain interference. Well-being, as a cumulative construct of quality of life and satisfaction was found to strongly correlate with self-reported physical function in bimanual tasks, self-reported activity and participation levels, self-reported satisfaction with prostheses and reduced pain interference. By contrast, neither age, gender, time since amputation nor reported prosthesis wear times were found to correlate with well-being in this population. While causality between these closely related and overlapping constructs may prove difficult to establish, their close relationships suggest that well-being in this population may be pursued through the thoughtful provision of an appropriate prosthesis and training to enable the performance of bimanual tasks tailored to the unique activity and participation needs of the individual.

Downloads

Published

2022-08-09

How to Cite

[1]
P. Stevens, A. Todd, S. Mandacina, D. England, and S. Wurdeman, “WELL-BEING AMONG INDIVIDUALS WITH UPPER LIMB AMPUTATION IS STRONGLY CORRELATED WITH BIMANUAL UPPER LIMB FUNCTION, ACTIVITY AND PARTICIPATION LEVELS, PROSTHETIC SATISFACTION AND LOWER RATES OF PAIN INTERFERENCE”, MEC Symposium, Aug. 2022.

Issue

Section

Clinical Research Studies