THE EFFECT OF SERIOUS GAME TRAINING ON UPPER LIMB PROSTHESIS CONTROL IN THE HOME ENVIRONMENT

Authors

  • Bart Maas
  • Zack Wright
  • Corry Van Der Sluis
  • Raoul Bongers

Abstract

Background: The focus of the field of upper limb prosthesis has primarily been on lab-based studies, while user-complaints do hardly change. Focus should shift to home use training and assessment. The current paper establishes whether training with serious games in the home setting affect upper limb prosthesis activation signals in Pattern Recognition controlled prostheses. Method: Ten upper limb prosthesis users were measured for a period of two weeks and were instructed to play serious games for at least 45 minutes per week. The activation signals before and after a serious game was played during daily life were measured. The activation signals were classified in involuntary and voluntary activations. Results: More involuntary activation signals than voluntary activation signals were recorded. Second, no effects of serious game training on activation signals in daily life were found. Conclusion: Even though no effect of serious game training was found, our findings show that recording and analyzing data derived from prosthesis users' daily life is feasible. However, much has still to be learned about the storage, applicability and meaning of this data. Our research underlines the importance of transitioning from lab-based research to research in daily life.

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Published

2022-08-09

How to Cite

[1]
B. Maas, Z. Wright, C. Van Der Sluis, and R. Bongers, “THE EFFECT OF SERIOUS GAME TRAINING ON UPPER LIMB PROSTHESIS CONTROL IN THE HOME ENVIRONMENT”, MEC Symposium, Aug. 2022.

Issue

Section

Clinical Research Studies